Applied Homogeneous Catalysis with Organometallic Compounds,

Content material:
Chapter 1 advent (pages 1–27): Boy Cornils and Wolfgang A. Herrmann
Chapter 2.1 Carbon Monoxide and Synthesis gasoline Chemistry (pages 29–194): Carl D. Frohning, Christian W. Kohlpaintner and Hans?Willi Bohnen
Chapter 2.2 Hydrogenation (pages 195–212): Henri Brunner
Chapter 2.3 Reactions of Unsaturated Compounds (pages 213–385): Walter Kaminsky and Michael Arndt?Rosenau
Chapter 2.4 Oxidations (pages 386–467): Reinhard Jira
Chapter 2.5 Reactions with Hydrogen Cyanide (Hydrocyanation) (pages 468–490): Steffen Krill
Chapter 2.6 Hydrosilylation and similar Reactions of Silicon Compounds (pages 491–512): Bogdan Marciniec
Chapter 2.7 response with Nitrogen Compounds: Hydroamination (pages 513–524): Rudolf Taube
Chapter 2.8 Reactions of Hydrocarbons and different Saturated Compounds (pages 525–556): Charles C. Hobbs, David A. Schiraldi, Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Marco Stoeckl
Chapter 2.9 uneven Syntheses (pages 557–585): Ryoji Noyori, Shohei Hashiguchi and Toru Yamano
Chapter 2.10 Ferrocene as a gas and gas Additive (pages 586–590): Wolfgang A. Herrmann
Chapter 2.11 The Suzuki Cross?Coupling (pages 591–598): Wolfgang A. Herrmann
Chapter 3.1 improvement of equipment: part 3.1.1–3.1.2.2.4 (pages 599–740): Boy Cornils and Wolfgang A. Herrmann
Chapter 3.1 improvement of equipment: part 3.1.3–3.1.13.4 (pages 740–871): Boy Cornils and Wolfgang A. Herrmann
Chapter 3.2 specified Catalysts and techniques: part 3.2.1–3.2.6.6 (pages 872–1033): Carsten Schultz, Harald Groger, Carlo Dinkel, Karlheinz Drauz and Herbert Waldmann
Chapter 3.2 detailed Catalysts and techniques: part 3.2.7–3.2.14.7 (pages 1034–1130): Carsten Schultz, Harald Groger, Carlo Dinkel, Karlheinz Drauz and Herbert Waldmann
Chapter 3.3 unique items: 3.3.1–3.3.6.5 (pages 1131–1240): Hans?Ulrich Blaser, Benoit Pugin and Felix Spindler
Chapter 3.3 particular items: 3.3.7–3.3.14.8 (pages 1241–1340): Hans?Ulrich Blaser, Benoit Pugin and Felix Spindler
Chapter 4.1 Homogeneous Catalysis ? Quo vadis? (pages 1341–1383): Wolfgang A. Herrmann and Boy Cornils

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Extra resources for Applied Homogeneous Catalysis with Organometallic Compounds, Second Edition

Example text

Bearing these facts in mind it is not surprising that a compromise between heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts, made by combining the advantages of the catalytic methods, has so far been attempted only from the homogeneous catalysis side, i. 1). 3) failed. ” remains unanswered [29]. Taking all methods of mineral oil processing into account, the relative share of heterogeneous to homogeneous catalysis is approx. 85: 15 [30]. Table 2 shows to what extent homogeneous catalysts are tailor-made and how variable and adaptable they are to the problem concerned by suitable reaction and unit processes, taking as examples the modern hydroformylation processes and catalysts.

44]), phase transfer catalysis [45], biphasic processes (e. , [46, 471) or separation with membrane modules [48, 491) are described in the relevant sections of this book (cf. [50]). Besides the central atoms of the molecular organometallic complexes and the variation of the application phase (heterogenization, two-phase catalysis; see below), the importance of the ligands surrounding transition metal centers should be mentioned [5 1-53]. The unexpectedly rapid advances in homogeneous catalysis were only possible by virtue of ligand modification of the “naked” transition metal complexes.

Further highlights in his life’s work were the synthesis of dibenzenechromium (C6H&Cr in 1955, the discoveries of the first metal carbene (1967), and the first metal-carbyne complex (1971). In 1964 he succeeded Walter Hieber to the chair of inorganic chemistry at Technische Hochschule Munchen from which he retired in 1985. He received the Nobel prize for chemistry jointly with Geoffrey Wilkinson (Imperial College London) in 1973. 23 Ryoji Noyori (born 1938) received his PhD at Kyoto University in 1967.

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